Can entrepreneurship be taught?

“Entrepreneurship can only be self-taught. There are many ways to do it right and even more wrong, but it cannot be processed, bottled, packaged, and delivered from a lectern”, one of our readers – Michael Marotta – commented on an earlier post.  

I am not sure I agree with the suggestion of that statement, namely that “entrepreneurship can only be self-taught”. Of course we hear it more often – “you cannot teach entrepreneurship” – but I have yet to see any evidence of it. Granted, this is a weak statement, since the evidence that business education helps with anything is rather scarce (although there is some)!

However, the fact that the majority of entrepreneurs did not have formal business education does not tell me anything. Suppose out of 1000 attempted entrepreneurs indeed only 100 had formal business education. It might still be very possible that out of the 100, 50 of them became successful, where out of the 900 others only 300 became successful. This means that out of the 350 successful entrepreneurs, a mere 50 had formal business education. However, 50% of business educated entrepreneurs became successful, while only 1/3 of entrepreneurs without business education did. 

My feeling about the potentially influence of business education on the odds of becoming a successful entrepreneur are quite the opposite of Marotta’s. I see quite a few attempted entrepreneurs with good business ideas and energy, however, they make some basic mistakes when attempting to build it into a business. The sheer logic of how to set up a viable business – once you have had a good idea – is something that is open to being “processed, bottled, packaged, and delivered from a lectern” (although that is hardly what we do in B-school).

Having a great idea and ample vision and energy perhaps is a necessary condition for becoming a successful entrepreneur, but it is not sufficient; this requires many other skills, and for some of them, education helps. Out of the 10 different skills needed to become a successful entrepreneur, perhaps only 5 can be taught or enhanced through business education, but those 5 will clearly improve your odds of making it. 

Perhaps the majority of successful entrepreneurs do not have formal business education, but I have yet to meet a successful enterpreneur who did go to business school who proclaims his/her education was not a great help in becoming a success. Invariably, those people claim their education helped them a lot. In fact, many of such business school alumni donate generously to their alma mater. For example, one of London Business School’s successful alumni entrepreneurs, Tony Wheeler (founder of Lonely Planet travel guides) regularly donates very substantial amounts of money to the School, because he believes his education there helped him greatly in making his business a success, and he wants others to have the same experience and opportunity.

In the absence of any formal evidence on whether business school education helps or hinders becoming a successful entrepreneur, I am inclined to rely on their judgement: business school education helps, if you want to become a successful entrepreneur.

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6 Comments on “Can entrepreneurship be taught?”

  1. davidburkus says:

    If the old maxim “experience is the best teacher” than isn’t the ability to learn from the experiences of others a more efficient teacher? Isn’t that what we do in business school?

  2. Hemant says:

    My question is, how many of the business education students attempt entrepreneurship? How much percentage does those 100 represent? Surely the BSchool education helps them, but the learnings can be better if we spend the same 2 years doing things in the real world.

    According to me (and I may be wrong), what business education offers you is networks, prestige and some financial skills.. Would love to know what are those 5 skills that can be taught in business education you have mentioned above.

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